Sessions and exhibits

APMCDRR Program

APMCDRR Program

Download APMCDRR Program here.

Plenaries

The Conference featured three 75-minute plenary sessions, with one focused on each of the three conference pillars:

  • Investing in Resilience and Preparedness
  • Shock-proofed Infrastructure and Systems
  • Resilient Communities

Learn more about the conference pillars.

Plenary

Risk informed investment and scaling up financing for disaster risk reduction 

Despite the large impact and cost of disasters, the level of investment in proactive prevention before disasters strike remains relatively low compared to the level of investment in reactive disaster response and recovery. This underscores the need for multi-sectoral risk-informed, resilience-building and risk reduction activities. When done effectively, these cost-effective investments reduce risks, minimise the impacts of natural hazards on hard-won development gains and sustainable development prospects. They protect lives and livelihoods, safeguard critical infrastructure and prevent and minimize disruptions to supply chains and essential services.

This plenary session discussed the urgent case for two vital transformations to accelerate investment that increases the resilience of infrastructure, systems, economies and communities. These transformations are: to address the imbalance between financing for disaster response and recovery and financing for disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate adaptation; and to embed multi-hazard risk analysis within public and private investment decisions.

Plenary

Making Infrastructure and Systems Resilient

Emerging economies in Asia and the Pacific region are rapidly increasing investment in physical infrastructure and associated systems. While much of the region’s population, particularly the poor, is increasingly urban and prone to natural hazards, other parts face increased exposure to climate change. Aging infrastructure must be maintained, and future infrastructure and services need to reduce risk, not exacerbate it. To do this, new infrastructure development must be disaster and climate resilient to protect investments, sustain essential services and prevent loss of life and livelihoods.  Resilient infrastructure is more than the protection of ‘hard’ infrastructure and is dependent on both the interconnected and standalone systems and people that support it. To this end it is also critical to address the issue of maintaining and upgrading aging infrastructure.

This plenary session considered these challenges and explored solutions, with the aim to develop recommendations laying out the steps necessary to advance infrastructure resilience in the Asia-Pacific.

Plenary

Community knows best: Reducing disaster risk for all

Disaster risk is context specific, and the impacts of disasters are felt most immediately and intensely at the local level. Yet disasters affect people differently and can exacerbate pre-existing inequalities. Due to the evolving nature of disasters, communities are becoming increasingly exposed to hazards. To build community resilience, there is a need to better understand risk and differentiated vulnerabilities by linking evidence, planning, decision-making and communication.

This plenary looked at the ways in which communities build their resilience; highlighted the importance of including diverse voices; and demonstrated localisation approaches that promote inclusion.

 

 

 

 

Working sessions

Working sessions focused on strategic and policy-related challenges structured around the three APMCDRR pillars, and formed the core of the substantive deliberations.

The twelve 60-minute sessions were specifically curated and designed to provide interactive and in-depth discussions on key challenges and lessons learnt, and was comprised of a moderator and panellists.

Working Session

Public investment to enhance climate and disaster resilience 

Public investments in disaster risk reduction are both responsible and cost-effective. Despite the benefits of investing in disaster risk reduction, funding is currently insufficient. There is a growing body of evidence underscoring the need to shift funding upstream, to focus on prevention and risk reduction. When done effectively, these investments address vulnerabilities and exposure, reduce loss of life and damage to assets, result in smarter investment, and can de-risk investments to encourage greater private sector engagement.

In this working session, panellists discussed opportunities to overcome traditional barriers that limit or restrict funding in disaster risk reduction. This includes the role of reforming public financial management to enhance strategic planning, and the role of improving risk and vulnerability information to in turn inform public investment so that it is sensitive of the risks now, and into the future.

Working Session 

Resilience Building for Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME) and the private sector 

Micro, small and medium enterprises (or MSMEs) comprise of more than 90 per cent of businesses in the Asia-Pacific region. They play a vital role in creating livelihoods, supporting well-being, and building social cohesion and value chains. As such, MSMEs are crucial in building resilience to shocks and disasters and in contributing to long-term recovery.

 In this working session, panellists discussed the critical role that MSMEs play in supporting the socio-economic system, as well as opportunities to further strengthen the capacity of MSME’s to both prevent new risks and reduce their risk to shocks, including disasters, and to prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters.

Working Session 

Financing resilient infrastructure 

The financing gap for investing in resilient infrastructure over the coming years is immense and continues to grow rapidly. Public funds are stretched as economies recover from the socio-economic impacts of COVID-19. Private investments can often flow to high-risk hazard-prone areas without fundamental pre-disaster investment in DRR or regulatory interventions. Well-coordinated investment from the public and private sector is required, not only for the initial capital but also crucially for their ongoing development, management and operation. In addition, there needs to be a long-term outlook for infrastructure sustainability: investments in infrastructure development projects have an economic life expectancy of 30 years or more, but many budgets do not go beyond the initial outlay, creating additional risk. The issue is exacerbated by the need to engage multiple stakeholders across the process.

This working session discussed how to scale up public and private investment for the ongoing development, management and operation of resilient infrastructure systems, including how to ground this in effective governance structures and policies.

Download Presentations: 1532 Yoshiki Hiruma

Working Session 

Governance and stakeholder engagement for resilient infrastructure services

Sound governance of infrastructure over its life cycle, along with fostering the active engagement, involvement and participation of end-users are important mechanisms to limit the severity of loss or damage during a disaster. They are also critical to harness the knowledge and experience of all stakeholders, including the community themselves.

This working session emphasised the importance of adopting a systems-based approach to developing and implementing the regulations and policies required to maintain shock-proof, resilient infrastructure. Such laws and policies should address all hazards and threats, ensure co-ordination across multiple sectors (public and private), cover the entire infrastructure life cycle and ideally foster transboundary co-operation. Focussing on the promotion of a ‘Think Resilience’ approach for regulation and policy development, the session provided examples of national and local practices that effectively integrate resilience into infrastructure governance and planning cycles.

Download Presentations: 1332 Satoru Nishikawa1333 Riyanti Djalante1334 Stephany Tan

 

Working Session 

Nature Based Solutions: Building Resilience
in Blue and Green

Coastal ecosystems act as a buffer against hazards such as storm surges, strong winds and cyclones – saving lives and limiting loss and damage to critical infrastructure and basic services. Nature-based solutions (NbS) can also mitigate climate change, as forests and the ocean absorb carbon. In many countries, the most vulnerable communities rely on ecosystems for their livelihoods and resilience, including healthy habitats for fisheries. 

This working session identified natural capital and NbS, including emerging technologies, “sponge cities” and mangroves, and share opportunities for scaling up green and blue infrastructure. It highlighted examples of adaptive infrastructure enhancing service continuity at the national, sub-national and local levels. The session shared initiatives and lessons in building resilience with local knowledge and materials.

Download Presentations: 1332 Nareerat Panmanee1334 Alfred Ralifo1335 Tony Wong;

Working Session 

Making Cities Resilient - harnessing the power of collective action

Urbanisation continues to be a defining trend in the Asia-Pacific region. In 2019, an estimated 2.3 billion people were living in cities in the Asia-Pacific region – and this is estimated to rise to 3.5 billion people by 2050. As countries have urbanised, so too have disasters. With climate change continuing to alter the frequency and intensity of natural hazards, more cities and people will be exposed to hazards amplifying existing vulnerabilities. As such, the success of the Sustainable Development Goals and the Sendai Framework will depend increasingly on what is being done to manage risks and build resilience in urban areas.

Within this context, this working session explored these issues by discussing: (1) current and future understandings of hazards, vulnerabilities and resulting risks in cities; and (2) potential solutions available to governments and local decision makers in managing hazards and building urban resilience.

Download Presentations: 1101 Yoo Jeong-bok1102 Bijal Brahmbhatt1103 Pamela Cajilig

Working Session 

Enabling resilient and accelerated recovery 

Accelerated risk-informed recovery results in net benefits for both economies and the well-being of affected populations, and can result in more inclusive, sustainable, and equitable recovery outcomes. Further, recovery after disasters offers opportunities to reset development pathways towards more sustainable, risk-informed, inclusive and resilient futures.

This working session discussed how to drive more efficient, effective and inclusive recovery. First, through discussing the financial tools available to respond to crises and rehabilitate services, reconstruct damaged assets and enable recovery (and how these mechanisms can be put in place in advance of disasters striking); and secondly through the pre-arranged institutional and community structures required to ensure financial tools achieve the Build Back Better principles.

Working Session 

Early warning early action - Reducing disaster deaths and losses   

Disasters cause loss of life, damage infrastructure and disrupt livelihoods. However, when governments, civil society organisations, communities and households have access to robust and timely information they can take actions to prevent or reduce losses. For this reason, the UN Secretary-General has launched a call to ensure that Early Warning Systems reach everyone within the next five years. 

This working session will consider the progress that has been made by key actors working with disaster management agencies to monitor andproduce hazard-related forecasts and deliver warnings as well as how to ensure early warnings reach the people, entities and places most exposed to those hazards in ways that are reliable, actionable, accessible and inclusive of all. 

Download Presentations: 1701 Doan Thi Tuyet Nga1702 Johan Stander1704 Md Shahjahan;

Working Session 

Scaling up, scaling out and scaling deep: Innovations in Disaster Risk Management 

With the rising incidence of disaster risks, the need for the increased use of innovation and new technology, tools, learning platforms and approaches in the disaster risk reduction space has never been greater. However, there remains a tremendous gap in the interface of science, technology, and policymaking, which is fundamental to scaling up innovation. At the same time, limited investments and the availability and prioritisation of resources can significantly impact a country’s ability to try new things. Examples of technological and process-orientated innovations in DRR abound (be that through drones, geospatial mapping or inclusive and participatory community based DRR planning), but scaling this innovation remains elusive.

This working session looked at the urgent need to enhance communication among key stakeholders and to increase opportunities to learn how science and technology could increase support for DRR work, especially among practitioners and governments.

Download Presentations: 1101 Takako Izumi1102 Manu Gupta1103 Nuraini Hanifa1104 Mahua Mukherjee;

Working Session 

Adaptive Social Protection 

The COVID-19 pandemic – and in many countries, the dual impacts of COVID-19 and extreme weather events – has demonstrated the critical importance of social protection systems in the face of multi-hazard shocks and crises. It has also highlighted the disproportionate impact of shocks on poorer households, informal workers, migrants, women, children, the elderly and people living with disabilities. Adaptive social protection systems anticipate and prevent shocks from becoming crises. They prepare people to cope with shocks and help with recovery and resilience strengthening.

This working session reflected on lessons from COVID-19 for adaptive social protection and focused on practical ways to link social protection with disaster risk reduction policy and practice. The session prioritised reflection on the use of social protection systems and programs to manage risk and vulnerability to shocks, including through links between social protection, disaster and climate risk reduction systems, climate adaptation, gender and social inclusion services and programs.

Working Session 

Building resilience through food security 

The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) has highlighted that “agriculture underpins the livelihoods of over 2.5 billion people – most of them in low income developing countries - and remains a key driver of development. At no other point in history has agriculture been faced with such an array of familiar and unfamiliar risks interacting in a hyperconnected world and a precipitously changing landscape”. Food security is a critical element of disaster resilience including resilient agricultural practices, resilient supply chains and affordable food supplies. The systemic nature of risk and the mutually reinforcing pressures from conflict, climate change, and the COVID-19 pandemic have led to the current “hunger catastrophe.”

This working session recognised that food insecurity is both a cause of crises and a symptom of crises. It lies at the nexus of the post-2015 agenda. The session discussed, how we must have a proactive and strategic approach that builds resilience and protects development gains. This ensures that we are doing more than reacting from crisis to crisis and achieving outcomes in gender, climate adaptation and resilience as well as alleviating hunger and future suffering.

Spotlight events

Highlighting a series of cross-cutting themes throughout the conference, the ten spotlight events will be 60-minute interactive discussions that focus on solutions-oriented case studies and best practice examples.

Spotlight 

Scaling up Disaster Risk Reduction in Fragile and Conflict Contexts

Conflict and disaster risk reduction efforts are inherently linked. Increasingly, evidence shows that people and institutions in fragile and conflict-affected contexts are much more vulnerable to disasters, with 58 percent of deaths from natural-hazard related disasters occurring in the top 30 most fragile states. Meanwhile, violence, conflict and fragility can undermine the capacity of governments, donors and civil society stakeholders to protect communities from and respond to disasters and implement policies minimising disaster risks.

In this spotlight session, panellists discussed the causal and linear relationship between conflict and state fragility, focusing on fragile state contexts and intra-state conflict. Panellists discussed existing barriers stopping fragile states from integrating disaster focused policy and explored ways to consider conflict when developing disaster risk reduction policies, programs and financing architecture.

Download Presentation here.

Spotlight 

Supporting health system resilience through the Bangkok Principles

In a pandemic, changing climate and times of geopolitical uncertainty, multi-hazard risks are putting unprecedented strain on health systems around the world.

This spotlight session, explored how the health and DRR communities can effectively work together to support the health community to enhance health system resilience. It also looked at how the health community can support the operationalisation of the Bangkok Principles and the Health Emergency and Disaster Risk Management Framework (Health EDRM). This included integrating emergency and disaster risk considerations into national and sub-national health strategies as well as primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare and related services.

Download Presentation here.

Spotlight 

Elevating local voice and leadership for better response and resilience 

All disasters are local, and local actors are critical to every stage of a disaster. They are working on prevention in their communities before the disaster occurs, leading and supporting response efforts when a disaster strikes, and aiding the long path to recovery. They bring with them contextual understanding of their communities and important local knowledge to shape inclusive and accessible disaster risk reduction, resilience and response. That is why diverse and representative national and local leadership is critical to effective risk reduction. With the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been even greater reliance on local actors – albeit with inadequate resourcing and support, and unfair risk distribution, highlighting the need for a more equitable operating model that truly elevates local voice and leadership in shaping response and resilience.

This spotlight session sought to demonstrate the importance of having diverse local voices and leadership in shaping resilience, response and recovery efforts, including how it leads to better outcomes in disaster risk management.

Spotlight 

Gender Transformative Disaster Risk Reduction

 

“Read the Companion Paper for Spotlight 4: Gender-Transformative Disaster Risk Reduction here” 

Understanding how people’s lives are impacted by gender norms, roles and relations within a given culture and society is critical to understanding and reducing disaster risk. Women, girls, boys, men, and people of diverse gender identities have distinct needs, capacities, skills and vulnerabilities in each context that shape the ways that they experience and recover from disaster and climate change impacts. Gender norms and roles also result in gender differentiated exposure to hazards, which along with women's limited access to information and risk communications has resulted in women dying at much higher rates than men in several recent disasters.

This spotlight session built on commitments outlined in the Agreed Conclusions of the 66th session of the Commission on the Status of Women, on the theme ‘Achieving gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls in the context of climate change, environmental and disaster risk reduction policies and programmes’. It showcased examples of gender-transformative DRR, highlighting the need to prioritise and invest in gender-transformative DRR, women’s empowerment and leadership in an intersectional way in order to support risk-informed sustainable development.  

Download Presentation here.

Spotlight 

Disaggregated data, country diagnostics and leaving no one behind 

Understanding disaster risk in all its dimensions of vulnerability, coping capacity, exposure, and hazard characteristics is essential to develop and implement strategies to prevent, reduce and manage present and future risks. One of the foundations of risk-informed development is an evidence-based approach to policy and investment decisions that addresses the needs of those most at risk to disasters. Policy makers mostly rely on official statistics, compiled and analysed with empirical rigour in all areas of governance, including disaster risk reduction.

This spotlight session examined the capacity gaps and innovative approaches to enhance technical and institutional capacities of member states for collecting, sharing and using sex, age, disability and income disaggregated disaster impact and risk data to inform decision making. And in turn how this data can be used to prevent and reduce disaster risk; assess challenges and opportunities in making data inclusive, accessible and available.

Download Presentation here.

Spotlight 

Disability Inclusive DRR: How leadership of people with disabilities is critical to an effective localisation agenda

The participation and leadership of persons with disabilities in disaster risk reduction benefits everyone. It is critical that persons with disabilities are not viewed as a homogenous ‘vulnerable group’ but as a diverse group of experts in their own lives with capacities, skills and knowledge that are valuable in the development and implementation of regional, national and local DRR strategies.

This spotlight session highlighted the importance of continuing to build a participatory, inclusive and universally accessible approach to DRR to enable increased resilience and reduced risks for all.

Download Presentation here.

Spotlight 

Strengthening inclusion of Indigenous Knowledge to build resilience.

Indigenous Peoples are local experts and continue to be the source of tested and trusted knowledge which strengthens community and regional resilience in the face of evolving hazards. Their unique inter-generational trust networks and value systems, ancestral knowledge, cultural practices, and local expertise and connections to the land have supported prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery mechanisms over generations. This has, as a result, reduced their vulnerabilities, and built resilience and sustainability.  This spotlight event highlighted the importance of preventative and inclusive approaches to manage disaster risk in partnership with Indigenous Peoples and local communities. It called for governments to engage directly with Indigenous Peoples in the design and implementation of policies, plans and standards.

Download Presentation here.

Spotlight 

A human rights-based approach to disaster displacement 

 

Further information

An average of 25 million people are displaced every year due to the threat and impacts of geophysical and hydrometeorological hazard events. Notably, more than 80 percent of documented disaster displacement between 2008-2019 occurred in Asia and the Pacific. In the Asia and the Pacific region, slow onset disasters, including drought driven by climate change, are key drivers for displacement. Effectively averting, minimising, and addressing the risks associated with disaster displacement requires a holistic approach with cross-sectoral partnerships that prioritise the rights and needs of displaced people and affected communities.

This spotlight session focused on practical, human rights-based approaches to both slow- and sudden-onset disaster-related displacement. This included how to assess potential displacement; prevent, prepare for and protect people during evacuation and throughout displacement in a way that minimises the risks they face; and support durable solutions to displacement.

Download Presentations: 1331 Christelle Cazabat1332 Cecilia Jimenez-Damary1333 Tasneem Siddiqui

Spotlight 

Children and Youth in Action

Children and youth across Asia and the Pacific are envisioning safe, healthy and prosperous futures for themselves, their friends, families and wider society. When provided with the support, tools and resources they need in ways that uphold their fundamental and legal rights they can actively contribute innovative, inclusive and outside-the-box risk-informed DRR, development and climate-proofed futures thinking, even when faced with multiple threats to their wellbeing due to increasing hazards.

This spotlight session promoted a child and youth-centred approach to disaster risk reduction and provided a platform for governments, child-centred organisations, communities, and children and youth themselves to take stock of achievements and share guidance and good practices.

Download Presentation here.

Spotlight 

Addressing the risks faced by LGBTQI+ people and people with diverse SOGIESC

LGBTQI+ people and people with diverse SOGIESC (sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics) face specific disaster risks which are rarely addressed in disaster risk reduction (DRR) efforts. This cohort continues to face discrimination, violence and exclusion before, during and after disasters.

This spotlight shared case studies as prompts for DRR organisations to consider how they strengthen inclusion. By recognising and empowering local leaders from the community, sharing knowledge, raising awareness, developing capacities, and supporting inclusive partnerships, we aimed to reduce the discrimination and stigma to ensure DRR efforts are truly inclusive of all. 

Download Presentation here.

United Nations & UN Stakeholders Group Pre-Conference Meetings

UNDRR ROAP offers an open and structured avenue for the engagement of stakeholders in the implementation of the Sendai Framework through key global, regional, and national policy processes. On the 19th of September, some stakeholders convened their members and interested delegates to discuss their initiatives and finalise their interventions for the APMCDRR 2022.

UN Stakeholder

NGOs/Civil Society

 

19 September 10:00 to 11:00
Room M1 (37 pax)

For information and registration contact:  

Ms. Takeshi Komino: t.komino@cwsjapan.org

UN Stakeholder

Indigenous People (TBC)

 

19 September: 10:00 to 11:00 Room M4 (400 pax)

For information

Ms. Branwen Millar: branwen.millar@un.org

UN Stakeholder

Women and Gender

 

19 September  11:15 to 12:15
Room M1 (37 pax )

For information and registration:
Ms. Ramona Miranda: 
ramo.miranda@yahoo.com

United Nations

UNDRR & WMO Center for Climate and Disaster Resilience

 

19 September 11:15 to 12:15

Room M4 (400 pax)

Open to all APMCDRR delegates
No registration

For information and registration:

Mr. Ben Churchill: bchurchill@wmo.int 

UN Stakeholder

Children, Youth and Child-centred Organizations 

12:30 to 13:30
Room M4 (400 pax)

 For information and registration

Ms. Jekulin Lipi: jekulin.lipi@unmgcy.org

Mr. Anish Shrestha: anish.giyc@unmgcy.org

UN Stakeholder

Private Sector (Business and Industry)

 

19 September: 13:45 to 14:45

Room M4 (400 pax)

 For information and registration:

Yuki Matsuoka: matsuoka@un.org
ARISE Japan: secretariat@arisejapan.jp

UN Stakeholder

Local Authorities

19 September 15:00 to 16:00
Room M1 (37 max)

 For information and registration:

Rendy Primrizqi: rendy.primrizqi@uclg-aspac.org

UN Stakeholder

Persons with Disabilities

19 September: 16:15 to 17:15 
Room M4 (400 max)

For information and registration:

Ms. Chrysant Lily Kusumowardoyo: chrysant.lily@asbindonesia.org

Partner events

Hosted by participating organisations, partner events covered a series of topics that linked to the 2022 APMCDRR theme – ‘From Crisis to Resilience: Transforming the Asia-Pacific Region’s future through disaster risk reduction’. The 19 partner events were conducted in parallel to the main sessions of the conference and  were 60 minutes in duration.

Monday, 19 September

Time: 13:00 – 14:00

Room: M3

Sendai Framework Midterm Review – Challenges and Way Forward.

Asian Disaster Preparedness Center (ADPC), Thailand

This event highlighted some common challenges faced by countries on the Sendai Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction implementation and showcase their solutions to address these issues. The event  also took a closer look at some recommendations on how to strengthen the Sendai Framework implementation from 2022 to 2030.

Download Presentations: 1300 Bazarragchaa Duudgai1300 David Koligatane1300 Pannapa Na Nan1300 Susana G. Juangco Philippines1300 Wang Wei;

Monday, 19 September

Time: 13:00 – 14:00

Room: M2

Disaster Waste Management for a Resilient Pacific

Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP), Samoa

This event  raised awareness for policy makers and disaster management officers in the region on how critical proper waste management is and how it can improve the capacity of Pacific Island Countries to prepare for emergencies and disasters, thereby ensuring timely and effective response and recovery.

Download Presentation here.

Monday, 19 September

Time: 14:30 – 15:30

Room: M3

Why effective DRR cannot be achieved without partnership with Organisations of Persons with Disabilities (OPDs): evidence and progress made so far.

ActionAid Australia, CBM Australia, VIC/ Arbeiter-Samariter-Bund (ASB) Indonesia

This partner event disseminated the progress and contribution made by the disability stakeholders in the Asia-Pacific region in realising the ‘all-of-society’ commitment made under the Sendai Framework.

Download Presentation here.

Monday, 19 September

Time: 14:30 – 15:30

Room: M2

Launch - Disaster Displacement in Asia and Pacific: scale, impacts and solutions.

Asian Development Bank (ADB), Philippines

This event built upon participants’ understanding of disaster displacement risk in Asia and the Pacific, the social and economic impacts of displacement, and good practice and approaches to address this risk.

Download Presentation here.

Monday, 19 September

Time: 16:00 – 17:00

Room: M3

From Science to Action: Risk Informing DRR and Development in Asia Pacific using Displacement Data.

Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC), Fiji

This event highlighted how data can help reduce the risks and negative impacts associated with disaster displacement in the Asia-Pacific region. Partners from the Pacific  shared their experiences on how displacement data has been used to risk-inform development. The session also advocated for the integration of dedicated displacement indicators in the Sendai Framework.

Download Presentations: 1600 Title Slide master1600 Christelle Cazabat;

Monday, 19 September

Time: 16:00 – 17:00

Room: M2

Experiences and challenges of emergency management volunteers.

Charles Darwin University

Volunteers play an important role in Australia and the entire Asia-Pacific region to help disaster-affected and at-risk communities. This Partner Event brought different volunteer-based organisations, volunteers, academic and research organisations and relevant stakeholders together to present their work and contribute to the promotion and exchange of knowledge. Key presentations in this session included the Australia Japan Foundation (AJF) supported ongoing project titled ‘Experiences and challenges of Emergency Management Volunteers in Australia and Japan’.

Download Presentations: 1601 Rajib Shaw1602 Kylie Ledger1603 Akhilesh Surjan1604 Ifte Ahmed;

Tuesday, 20 September

Time: 13:30 – 14:30

Room: M2

Discussions on the outcomes of the Inaugural Pacific Disaster Risk Reduction Minsters Meeting.

National Disaster Management Office (NDMO), Fiji

This partner event brought together stakeholders to discuss the outcomes of the Inaugural Pacific DRR Ministers Meeting held in Nadi, Fiji from 14-16 September.  Panellists from across the Pacific discussed cooperation in advancing the agenda for DRR across the region, in line with their regional commitments.

Download Presentation here.

Tuesday, 20 September

Time: 15:30 – 16:30

Room: M4

Enabling Resilient, Sustainable and Inclusive Infrastructure Transitions in Small Island Developing States.

Coalition for Disaster Resilient Infrastructure (CDRI), India

This partner event discussed the multiple transitions faced by Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and the approaches for integrating resilience in critical infrastructure, namely power, telecommunication, and transport. It explored innovative finance, technology, and capacity building measures that will promote resilient, inclusive and sustainable infrastructure as these nations transition in the coming decade.

Download Presentation here.

Tuesday, 20 September

Time: 15:30 – 16:30

Room: M2

Mainstream Innovation: Empower Youth Leadership for Disaster Risk Reduction.

National Disaster Reduction Centre of China, Ministry of Emergency Management, China (NDRCC of MEM China) and UNICEF China Office.

Children and young people are important partners in DRR. This event provided a platform for youth to share their views, insights and innovations to advance disaster risk reduction and climate change adaption. It aims to promote dialogue, exchange and networking among child and youth-centred organisations in the region.

Download Presentation here.

Tuesday, 20 September

Time: 17:00 – 18:00

Room: M2

The Asian Local Leaders Forum for Disaster Resilience (ALL4DR): Recognising, Linking, and Enhancing the Power of Local Leadership.

Asian Disaster Reduction and Response Network (ADRRN), India

Local leaders are the biggest reasons behind disasters that didn’t happen. ALL4DR is a forum to recognise, enhance and link the power of local leadership to put localisation into action. In this event, the role and evidence from selected local leaders was highlighted, showing links between their local leadership and aspiration of the Sendai Framework, which we are all working towards achieving.

Download Presentation here.

Wednesday, 21 September

Time: 11:00 – 12:00

Room: M2

From Bali to Brisbane – Actioning Integration in the Pacific.

World Vision Australia (WVA) – Lead

Consortium: Humanitarian Advisory Group (HAG), The University of South Pacific (USP), The Pacific Community (SPC), The Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat (PIFS), Pacific Resilience Partnership (PRP), Australian Humanitarian Partnership (AHP)

This session built on existing collaboration between WVA, HAG, PIFS and SPC, who have been working together on integrated approaches for the past 18 months. Participants were left with an understanding of why integration should be a priority for themselves and their organisations/stakeholders. Participants  also understood what actions can be taken to tangibly progress the integration agenda in their contexts.

Download Presentation here.

Wednesday, 21 September 2022

Time: 13:30 – 14:30

Room: M1

Towards the Evidence-based Disaster Risk Reduction in the Asia-Pacific Region.

The Indonesian National Disaster Management Authority (BNPB) & United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)

Sharing good practices and lessons - learnt in promoting and developing the evidence-based disaster risk reduction. This event shared perspectives of the Asia-Pacific post - pandemic challenges and the role that evidence-based disaster risk reduction has in transforming crisis to resilience.

Download Presentation here.

Wednesday, 21 September

Time: 13:30 – 14:30

Room: M2

Building Resilient Communities by Investing in DRR Literacy for Proactive Actions focusing on “Leave No One Behind”.

Asian Disaster Reduction Centre (ADRC), Japan

Enhancing DRR literacy is one of the important keys for enhancing community resilience. This event offered insights on how to effectively promote and build resilient communities through enhancing DRR literacy of community members for proactive actions in emergencies.

Wednesday, 21 September

Time: 15:30 – 16:30

Room: M2

Technology and Innovation for Disaster Resilience through Public-Private Partnerships and Multi-Sectoral and Regional Partnerships.

Arise Philippines [Joint Partner Event] – Asian Institute of Management, National Resilience Council, UNICEF, International Finance Corporation, SM Development Corporation, Philippines

As a key driver of technology, businesses play a crucial role in developing and supporting specialized innovative tools and solutions that can enhance their management of disaster and climate risks. This can be very useful to the public sector as well. This event explored and highlighted common and intersecting good practices among the whole of society and multi-stakeholder partnerships across the region.

Download Presentation here.

Wednesday, 21 September

Time: 17:00 – 18:00

Room: M3

Climate Risk and Early Warning Systems (CREWS) for Pacific Island Nations: Droughts, Tropical Cyclones and Floods.

Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM)

This partner event highlighted how applications of modern science and technology can create solutions for Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and Least Developed Countries (LDCs). It also shared experiences on strengthening Multi-Hazard Early Warning Systems (MHEWS), and address the unique needs of island, coastal and remote communities through MHEWS to strengthen their capacity in disaster preparedness to help mitigate the impact of droughts, tropical cyclones, and floods.

Download Presentation here.

Wednesday, 21 September

Time: 17:00 – 18:00

Room: M2

The Hindu-Kush Mountains and Protection of Indigenous Culture and Knowledge.

Yfeed: Youth for Environment, Indigenous Knowledge, Nepal

In this event, the facts, concerns and gaps of climate change and disasters in mountain ecosystems were addressed. Locals shared best practices of Indigenous culture, as well as knowledge that reduces the effects of climate change and disasters. This event aimed  to assist in the development of a resilient mountain community in the Hindu-Kush Mountains.

Download Presentation here.

Thursday, 22 September

Time: 11:00 – 12:00

Room: M2

Recipes for Success to Scale up Comprehensive School Safety (CCS) across Asia Pacific

UNICEF, Thailand

Consortium: IFRC, ADPC, World Vision, Save the Children, Plan International, UNESCO and UNDRR

This event launched the new Comprehensive School Safety Framework (CSSF), 2022-2030 to stakeholders in Asia and the Pacific. Participants explored the CSSF to understand how education systems and infrastructure can be shock-responsive and discussed how the framework can be applied in other countries through similar initiatives.

Download Presentation here.

Thursday, 22 September

Time: 13:30 – 14:30

Room: M2

Realising Women’s Leadership for Resilience in the Asia-Pacific Region

Humanitarian Advisory Group (HAG), Australia

Women are powerful agents of change in DRR and risk-informed development. This event showcased best practices and shared case studies on how to combat barriers to create an enabling environment for women’s leadership in policymaking, planning, programming, budgeting and institutionalising women’s leadership at all levels throughout the Disaster Risk Management cycle.

Download Presentations: 1331 Beth Eggleston1332 Fega Pangestika

Thursday, 22 September

Time: 15:30 – 16:30

Room: M3

Changing the way we manage disasters: Unpacking the potential of anticipatory action in Pacific Island Countries 

Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), Thailand

Anticipatory action cannot be copied and pasted from one country to another. Contextualization is key to success and ownership at the national level. This event converged partners and key stakeholders on disaster risk management in the Pacific to show how it can work across scales to help communities and governments manage disasters.

Download Presentation here.

Thursday, 22 September

Time: 15:30 – 16:30

Room: M2

Strengthening the Socio-Economic Resilience of Communities

 

World Bank, Australia 

This partner event highlighted how the impacts of natural hazards are exacerbated in lower-income countries and communities. It discussed tools and methodologies available to help national and local governments respond more quickly to disasters, including for poor and vulnerable households to foster socioeconomic resilience.  The session also identified priority areas of needs and gaps for strengthening resilience and discuss key lessons learnt.

Ignite Stage 

The ignite stage  was a key part of the APMCDRR program linked to the three key pillars of the conference. It provided conference participants the opportunity to listen to 15 minute segments from a diverse range of speakers on key conference topics. The ignite stage provided organisations an accessible and interactive space for knowledge sharing experience on a particular topic.

IGNITE STAGE SCHEDULE

TUESDAY

PRESENTATION NAME

COUNTRY

DELIVERED BY

10:30 - 10:45

Experiences and challenges of Emergency Management Volunteers

Australia

Charles Darwin University

10:50 - 11:05

Climate induced disasters: the Mongolian experience - prevention, prediction, preparedness and proactive response

Mongolia

United Nations and Mongolian Red Cross Society

11:10 - 11:25

Increasing hydrological capacity to enhance flash flood early warning systems performance and strengthen disaster risk reduction systems

Australia

Australian Water Partnership

11.30 - 11.45

CAN DO's Safe and Ready Project - Building Resilience in the Pacific

Australia

Pacific Conference of Churches

12:10 - 12:25

Conversations about research and disaster/emergency management

Australia

Office of the Inspector-general of Emergency Management

12:30 - 12:45

Nepal Innovative Effort to Localize Humanitarian Standard

Nepal

Disaster Preparedness Network

12:50 - 13:05

Strengthening disaster resilience in Cakaudrove province, Fiji, through traditional knowledge and community food security

Fiji

Na I Soqosoqo Vakamarama I Taukei Cakaudrove

13:10 - 13:25

The Queensland Fire and Biodiversity Consortium: sharing the impact of a high functioning fire preparedness collaboration

Australia

Healthy Land And Water

13:30 - 13:45

The Framework for Integrating Human Rights and Gender Equality: A vehicle for transformative change in DRR and CCA

Thailand

Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law

14:10 - 14:25

Showcasing the Inter-generational Disaster Preparedness Programme 'Prostoot'

Bangladesh

Cyclone Preparedness Programme

14:30 - 14:45

Networking among Pacific island countries to face together the impacts of climate change

France

Gouvernement De La Nouvelle-calédonie

14:50 - 15:05

     

15:55 - 16:10

Rise and Shine: Young People Leading Innovative School-based Early Warning System in Small Island Communities

Philippines

United Nations Children's Fund

16:15 - 16:30

You've been warned: a new accessible and national approach to timely, tailored warning information ahead of severe weather

Australia

New State Emergency Service

 

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY

PRESENTATION NAME

COUNTRY

DELIVERED BY

10:30 - 10:45

Battling Disaster Induced Displacement: A Participatory, Inclusive and Rights-Based Action Plan in Bangladesh

Bangladesh

Refugee and Migratory Movements Research Unit

10:50 - 11:05

Collective Action for Collective Impact to reduce diverse risks of coastal Communities of Bangladesh

Bangladesh

Amerinca Red Cross

11:10 - 11:25

Gender Approach in a Patriarch Society: Setting the Workable and Realistic Indicators for Disaster Risk Reduction

Timor-Leste

World Vision Timor Leste

11.30 - 11.45

Disability Inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction in Nepal

Nepal

Atullya Foundation Private Limited

11:50 - 12:05

Human Capacity Building that supports Community Disaster Management

Japan

 City of Sendai

12:10 - 12:25

The use of technology in disaster risk reduction - The case of the Fiji Islands

Fiji

National Disaster Management Office

12:30 - 12:45

5 steps for a resilient Australia against fires and floods

Australia

Minderoo Foubdation Fire and Flood Resilience

12:50 - 13:05

Urban resilience to climate extremes in Asia and the Pacific: From Risk to Resilience

Thailand

Asian Disaster Preparedness Center

13:10 - 13:25

The Anticipation Dance

Australia

Australian Red Cross

13:30 - 13:45

The leadership of persons with disabilities in resilience-building initiatives

Indonesia

Arbeiter-Samariter-Bund Indonesia and The Philippines

13:50 - 14:05

The Connecting Business initiative: Engaging business networks for disaster resilience

Various

Vanuatu Business Resilience Council; UNDP Connecting Business initiative

14:35 - 14:50

Can't you hear me?  Successfully overcoming the challenges of emergency messaging for deaf community members in a system based on sound and commonly used written English

Australia

Cairns Regional Council

14:55 - 15:10

To promote multi-stakeholder collaboration to achieve SFDRR targets - Invitation to collaborate for sustainable DRR activities through business from the perspective of a private sector association with a wide variety of DRR solutions and technologies

Japan

Japan Bosai Platform

15:15 - 15:30

Genuinely integrating communications into our forecasts and ensuring users of the information understand the warnings is promoting community preparedness to disaster in Fiji

Fiji

Fiji Meteorological Service

15:35 - 16:05

Intergrating sexual reproductive health and  gender-based violence prevention into DRR

Various

International Planned Parenthood Federation

16:15 - 16:30

Practical experiences of Early Warning System in the Asia Pacific region.

Various

World Meteorological Organization

 

 

 

 

THURSDAY

PRESENTATION NAME

COUNTRY

DELIVERED BY

10:30 - 10:45

Diversity and DRR - who’s voices are heard or hidden

Philippines

Humanitarian Advisory Group

10:50 - 11:05

PDRF: Engaging the Private Sector in Building Resilient Communities

Philippines

Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation

11:10 - 11:25

Institutionalizing SADDD for disaster risk reduction  and COVID-19 recovery in the Asia-Pacific region

Thailand

Un Women

11.30 - 11.45

Local youth initiative flood early warning tool

Indonesia

Yayasan Plan International Indonesia

11:50 - 12:05

Maritime Disaster Prevention through Digitalization

Malaysia

Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency

12:10 - 12:25

Beyond incremental thinking - Transformative approaches for disaster risk reduction

Australia

ANU Institute for Climate, Energy and Disaster Solutions

12:30 - 12:45

Australia’s first Systemic Disaster Risk Handbook: Shifting Mindsets and Action for Systemic Disaster Risk

Australia

Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience

12:50 - 13:05

r Women environmental defenders – defying

Thailand

Stockholm Environment Institute, Asia Center

13:10 - 13:25

Collective action to drive gender transformative Disaster Risk Reduction

Australia

ActionAid Australia

13:30 - 13:45

Resilient communities through local observations in global platforms: Readying the Pacific for future weather.

Tonga

Tonga Meteorological Service

13:50 - 14:05

Fiji's experiences to ensure youth's commitment and leadership for disaster risk reduction and climate actions

Fiji

Fiji Ministry Of Youth And Sports

14:35 - 14:50

Intra-organisational silence on risks as a fundamental vulnerability for disaster prevention: a digital communication solution for building resilience

China

North China University of Water Resources
and Electric Power

14:55 - 15:10

High Impact Weather Project (HIWeather) Citizen Science Project

New Zealand

Massey University

15:15 - 15:30

exci's early bushfire detection and notification system - smoke alarm for the bush

Australia

exci pty ltd

15:35 - 15:50

Rise and Shine: Young People Leading Innovative School-based Early Warning System in Small Island Communities

Philippines

Shine - Unicef

Learning Labs

The Learning Lab was a dedicated space to actively share good practices and to learn from each other on innovative approaches for implementing the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. The seven Learning Labs facilitated small groups of peer-to-peer learning in a low-pressure environment. Learning Labs were 90 minutes in duration.

Tuesday 20 September

Time: 13:30 – 15:00

Room: M1

School Safety Programme Towards a Culture of Disaster Prevention in Korea.

The Ministry of the Interior and Safety, Republic of Korea

The intention of this session was to raise awareness of disaster risk reduction and increase resilience for young learners. It also aimed to help school teachers develop their capacity to become disaster risk reduction educators by using various interactive training materials.

Tuesday 20 September

Time: 15:30 – 17:00

Room: M1

Gender Considerations in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR): An All-of-Government Approach to Inclusive DRR Governance.

Duryog Nivaran, Sri Lanka  

(with ADPC and Gender Stakeholder Group)

This session focused on the critical role and responsibilities that development institutions have in improving and ensuring gender inclusive DRR governance. It will also covered good practices and challenges in gender inclusive DRR governance, and actions that can be taken towards an all-inclusive government approach in DRR governance.

Wednesday 21 September

Time: 11:00 – 12:30

Room: M1

Climate Change Science & Humanitarian Impacts – What the Recent IPCC Reports Entail for Asia Pacific.

International Federation of Red Cross & Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre (RCCC) and Australian Red Cross (ARC)

This session focused on the humanitarian consequences of climate change, including impacts of climate change on vulnerable people. It also covered the role of the humanitarian community to support efforts to minimize, avert and address loss and damage and actions to ensuring that no-one is left behind.

Wednesday 21 September

Time: 15:30 – 17:00

Room: M1

Sharing and Growing – The Importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Knowledge in Disaster Risk Reduction and Building Resilience.

Queensland Reconstruction Authority, Australia

This session focused on the importance of knowledge sharing within a community to build resilience and showcasedexamples of how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge is being incorporated into recent DRR practices in land, sea and resource management.

Thursday 22 September

Time: 11:00 – 12:30

Room: M1

The Cost of Doing Nothing – Scenarios for Investing in Resilience.

United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) Asia Pacific, Indonesia

Learn why it is important to invest in resilience and develop financing mechanisms for DRR. This session examined challenges faced by local governments for financing DRR and resilience actions and showcased instruments and examples that can help develop governance and financing mechanisms to accelerate local DRR and resilience actions.

Thursday 22 September

Time: 13:30 – 15:00

Room: M1

Harnessing Social Media and Technology for Disaster Management.

Asian Development Bank and Amazon Web Services, Philippines

Know how policy makers and disaster risk management practitioners can harness the power of social media to gather, sort, and display information about disasters, such as floods, in real-time in a manner that removes the need for expensive and time-consuming data processing? This  session demonstrated the PetaBencana platform that can do all this and more.

Marketplace

The Marketplace Formed the heart of the conference. It  was a place where everyone could meet, connect and collaborate with each other. With up to 60 exhibitors, multiple meeting hubs, an Ignite Stage and an array of displays, it was the hive of activity during the conference. Get a glimpse into the exhibitors participating in the marketplace here

Pacific Pavilion

APMCDRR featured a collaborative learning and engagement space that showcased the scientific and technical innovations that have been created to reduce disaster risk in the Pacific. It supported increased learning on disaster risk reduction strategies for Asia-Pacific delegates from all stakeholder groups.